Class Certification

Overview

Edgeworth experts are industry leaders when it comes to applying economic tools to the analysis of class certification. We have made pivotal contributions to the literature on evaluating questions of common impact and formulaic damages and have worked on precedent-setting litigation matters.

Edgeworth economists address class certification issues—advising on critical data questions, developing economic models to consider the appropriateness of class treatment, submitting expert reports, and testifying at deposition and in court.

Our approach is centered on developing economic analysis that is rigorous, defensible, and can be communicated to our audience of counsel and courts in a straightforward and understandable manner. We address class certification issues across industries and practice areas, including antitrust, labor and employment, false advertising, and data privacy.

In Antitrust, Edgeworth economists work with clients in all phases of class certification—from assisting with developing the discovery record to providing expert testimony. Our experts test the propositions of common impact and formulaic damages in litigation where acts of collusion or monopolization are alleged. We apply rigorous and scientific frameworks for assessing whether common evidence can be used to assess impact and damages to the proposed class, or if the economic analysis dictates the need for individualized inquiries.

In Labor and Employment, Edgeworth experts have analyzed class allegations of discrimination, wage and hours violations, and other employment-related claims. We have testified on the commonality and typicality aspects and have critiqued liability analyses and damages models presented at the class certification phase.

Case Experience

Case Experience

Insights & News

Publications

Speaking Engagements

News

Practice Contacts

Experts

An Edgeworth Economics team was retained to consult on behalf of C&S. Dr. Johnson ultimately testified at trial in Minnesota federal court regarding whether the alleged conspiracy caused grocery stores to pay higher prices than they otherwise should have.

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